YOU'RE INVITED

Join MENTOR New York virtually on

September 24, 2020 from 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Help us to close the mentoring gap and ensure that all young people in NY have access to safe and caring mentoring relationships. Your support is the fuel that propels our work forward allowing our services to reach over 850 mentoring programs across NY state and beyond. We can’t do this without you.

Support MENTOR New York's virtual event:

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At MENTOR New York, we believe you matter. You the mentors, the volunteers, the longtime supporters, the corporate investors, the strategic partners and so many others. You the champions for mentoring. You matter.  

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Ali Hoban

Managing Director of Program, Student Sponsor Partners

"I very much trust their [MENTOR NY] judgment and I feel they have the experience to be leading other organizations through this very challenging time.”

 

Ali works tirelessly to implement every resource at the program's disposal for it’s mentees who are living below the poverty line. Racing the clock to provide Chrome Books for kids before the school year is over. Connecting with mentors and giving them support as they experience this pandemic themselves.

Read Ali's Story

TRAINING LINKS

To learn more about the Young Professionals Advisory Board or how to get involved, please contact

Hadleigh Kindberg at hkindberg@mentorkids.org or call 212-953-0945. 

Morgan is currently a Director of Product Marketing at Wealth-X. Prior to joining the firm in 2015, she held Marketing positions at U.S. Trust and Sotheby's, focusing primarily on digital content and distribution. She joined the YPAB in 2016 and is in her 3rd year as co-chair. Morgan graduated in 2013 from Bucknell University magna cum laude with majors in Art History and Italian Studies.

Nicole currently works as an Associate at WisdomTree Asset Management. Prior to joining WisdomTree, Nicole worked at UBS in Private Wealth Management. She began her career at NewStar Financial, a boutique alternative asset management firm working as an Analyst after completing their internship program. Nicole graduated from Boston College in 2015.

 

Nicole joined YPAB in 2017 and this is her first year as Co-Chair. Nicole was recently selected to join the Mentorship Committee at WisdomTree. In her spare time, Nicole enjoys fitness classes, spending time with her family and friends, trying new restaurants, and traveling.

Nicole White

Board Members

Education:

Loyola University Maryland

 

Current Company:

Lynbrook Union Free School District

Allison Banhazl

Education:

Holy Cross

 

Current Company:

KLS Advisors

Ryan Buser

Education:

Duke University

 

Current Company:

WisdomTree Asset Management

Grace Fallon

Education:

Bucknell University

 

Current Company:

WisdomTree Asset Management

Megan McGurk

Education:

Yale University

 

Current Company:

KPMG

Jason Pelletier

John is currently pursuing his PH.D in Clinical Psychology at Hofstra University where he is a member of the Anxiety and Depression Clinic. Prior to returning to school, he worked in advertising at Mindshare handling a wide range of Personal Care brands for Unilever. He previously served as a Co-President of the YPAB and has been involved with Mentoring’s Night Out since its inception.

John Boisi

Education:

UNC Wilmington (BA)

 

Current Company:

Cox Media Group

Sean Bryne

Education:

Holy Cross

 

Current Company:

SIFMA

Evan Grogan

Education:

Boston College

Current Company:

PayPal

Kate O'Connor

Education:

Yale University (BA)

University of Chicago Booth School of Business (MBA)

Current Company:

C3

Patrick Sedden

Zach currently serves as the Global Vice President of Customer Success at Diligent Corporation, which is the leading Enterprise Governance Management provider of secure corporate governance and collaboration solutions for boards and senior executives. Zach received his BA in American Studies from Yale University and his MBA from The Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania.  He was the inaugural Chairman of the Board for Nourish Now, a non-profit organization in MD that tackles hunger issues, and is a Co-Founder of the Young Professional Advisory Board for MENTOR NY (where he worked for four years after college). Zach has three boys — aged 8, 9 and 11 — and when not attending their numerous sporting activities, he can be found on the golf course, at a poker table or attending a concert.

Zach Boisi

Education:

Duke University

 

Current Company:

Amazon Web Services

Emily Coscia

Education:

Boston College

 

Current Company:

The Windward School

Louise Marenakos

Education:

Hobart and William Smith

Current Company:

Group Nine Media

Perry Osteimer

Education:

Hamilton College

Current Company:

Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Patrick Sullivan

…transition to the virtual space.

How MENTOR NY Supported Simeon's Work

“[MENTOR New York] helped myself and mentors on how to transition mentoring in a virtual space. Those round tables with other mentors around the city helped us to hear what other people were doing and how other centers were making it work. It gave us an idea of what we can do.”

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Simeon Pollydore

Program Director, Redfern Cornerstone, The Child Center of NY

“I just love people. That is my main and overall motivation. Then when you get to the point where you are seeing that you have an impact. I would say that is a secondary motivation because then you are seeing how beneficial it is, what you are doing. You are seeing the positive impact and how you are assisting people either learn, grow, or assist people to assist other people.”

Due to the destructive strike of the pandemic, thousands of families and children are confronted with unexpected and unprecedented challenges in their lives. As the Program Director of Redfern Cornerstone for the Child Center of NY, Simeon Pollydore worked on the front line of the NYC Cornerstone to help families and children in his community.

 

In the early days of the pandemic, Simeon’s program site became a food distribution center for the community while young people were at home for the quarantine. Months later, he is happy to have resumed offering safe, in-person services to youth.

 

Challenge Faced by Families

“There are children who we don’t know how tough it is to be in their home,” said Simeon. It could be difficult for parents as well. Simeon witnessed firsthand the impossible choices that parents are facing when they have jobs that require them to be in-person, even when their children might not have in-person care available due to the pandemic.

 

“You don’t understand…you don’t understand…” said one mother with tears in her eyes as she explained that she would have to quit her job if she couldn’t get additional in-person services for her child. Seeing the difficult situation, Simeon and his team worked creatively to find a solution, and he later realized that “what she was making me aware of was the fact that I didn’t know how more extreme [the situation must] be” than imagined. 

 

Two-Way Learning & Resiliency

Even through the difficulties of the pandemic, Simeon finds joy in his work with young people, especially in the two-way learning experience that mutually benefits both the young people and their mentors.

 

As mentors and program coordinators, they teach children how to dance, how to create art, how to speak, how to present themselves, etc. “However, sometimes we don’t focus on what it is that we learned from them,” said Simeon.

 

Resiliency is at the top of the list of lessons Simon says he learns from young people, especially during the pandemic. “Children will fall out and they will have issues with one another. Two seconds later, they are back being friends again. Resiliency within life/anything is one of the major things that I’ve taken from them.”

Starting from playing school as a game when he was growing up to now working at an afterschool program, Simeon adhered to his childhood dream, always knowing “I love to impart whatever knowledge that I got and learned from them [the kids] as well because I do see the relationship as a mutually beneficial one.”